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Poster: Dhamma1 Date: Nov 22, 2009 5:56pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Our kids and the Dead

The thread earlier today set me wondering (again) about the lasting value of the band and its music. I mean, did you have be there in order to have your life changed by it? Or is the music simply so powerful that it will outlast the lives of the people who made it and their original audience? How many people will be getting on the metaphorical bus 20 or 50 years from now?

Speculations invited.

Personally, I think the band's music will take its place alongside the best of American culture -- timeless ideas in the lyrics, enough variety of musical styles to appeal to a wide public, and personalities typifying a time and place that will always fascinate a significant number of people. Thousands of people study Thoreau and the Transcendentalists of the 1840s, or read Hemingway and Fitzgerald to discover the "Roaring 20s"; I think the Dead will live on in similar fashion, as icons of the Sixties and transmitters of a genuine mystical tradition.

Whoa, does that sound pompous. But what do you think?

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Poster: skies Date: Nov 23, 2009 5:29am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Our kids and the Dead

Hi Dhamma !In the 60's, we had an international trend called the hippies ,including rock music, women's rights , political world consciouness and buddhist spirituality of various colors . The Grateful Dead were one among others , being hippies with a californian flavors , but as decennies went by , scattering all to the four winds , the Grateful Dead remained the symbol of what hippies xere all about and that is due to deadheads themselves , time after time . Youth may one day re invent this gathering of the tribes with another band , fashions ,values outlasting whatever else is going on in the rest of the world,counter culture where frienships are true and easier that in the overly strctured society. That is the best we can hope for in a world we can't change anyway : surviving decently in human societies as they are and finding a fluid world circle of friends like minded but of various opinions too, that being the real test of being civilized (and not only provincial ) .Only one flag : grooving together ! Deadheads did that , may it goes on ,yes ?

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Poster: William Tell Date: Nov 22, 2009 6:41pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Our kids and the Dead

One of my boys defn is on the bus in the sense of, eg, StSt being a song he's listened to 100s of times (no, not cause I played it for him! it was when he went away to college even--all on his own). He doesn't "collect" their music, but defn considers them one of his top twenty bands. Another son that is quite musically astute appreciates them, esp Jerry and all his side projects (you know this one, Arb!) and certainly considers them a very important musical influence...so yep, I think a defn generational bridge has been established in my family...grand kids await!?

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Poster: _UIU_ Date: Nov 22, 2009 7:28pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Our kids and the Dead

Ya, my father never really my glitter days w/ KISS or being thrown out of Disneyland @ 15, drunk with our dates and marching in the Christmas Parade.

Now I would be scared in "Butt Pirates of the Caribbean".

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Poster: Beantown Stevo Date: Nov 22, 2009 6:13pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Our kids and the Dead

From somebody who never got a chance to see them live once....hear hear.

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Poster: deadpolitics Date: Nov 23, 2009 11:55am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Our kids and the Dead

I happened upon the Grateful Dead because of my desire to learn about true American culture and history. There was so much left out in US History class... I mean... we barely even got to Vietnam! (this was in early 2000's)

My parents brought me over from the former Soviet Union in 1994 so they didn't know anything about the 60's counterculture movement - except they passed on the Beatles, Eagles, Steve Miller, Elton John, Billy Joel, and others.

So yes, Dhamma, just like you said, I have been using the music to connect with a history of American subculture. The Grateful Dead, as I've realized, utilize music to represent something much deeper than what you hear. It just takes time to peel the layers.

Between the GD, Kesey, Kerouac, Cassady, Ginsberg, Burroughs, Gary Snyder, and others, a more real version of America has been shown to me - they are the link - the manifestation of change.

Okay, back to an assignment on the aeration of a waste water treatment reactor. Gotta love poop.

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Poster: _UIU_ Date: Nov 22, 2009 6:40pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Our kids and the Dead

We had microbuses, milk trucks, and even rode the AOL virtual bus, but never the greyhound. Green Tortoise would to tours with at least 100 heads.

Knowledge and wisdom is a two way street >
http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-83912685.html

This post was modified by _UIU_ on 2009-11-23 02:40:44